Tag Archives: Song

Fraternity House Song

 

General Information about Item:

  • Verbal folklore
  • Informant R.C.
  • Date Collected: 05/18/2020

Informant Data:

  • The informant is a current Dartmouth student. He is a member of the class of 2022 and is affiliated.

Contextual Data:

  • Cultural Context: When rushing a fraternity, there is a sense of pride and community associated with the house and its members. Members are seen as “brothers” and the house is the “home” of its members. The singing of a song honors these two traditions.
  • Social Context: The collective act of singing together has always been associated with the idea of community. The singing of a house song is a social activity new and old members participate in to foster this principle.

Item:

  • There is a song made up by the fraternity members, that is sung to honor the house and its members. This is meant to help new members feel welcomed during the rush process (or directly after).

 

Collector’s Comments:

  • The use of a song to help new members feel part of a new community is not uncommon. I thought it was interesting to see the same type of welcoming folklore displayed in this process.

Collector’s Name: Charlie Wade

Tags/Keywords:

  • Verbal Folklore
  • Fraternity Rush
  • New Members

Ssa-ga (unofficial chant)

General Information about Item:
  • Genre and Sub Genre –  Verbal Folklore (song) with connotations of Cutomary Folklore: Rituals / Rites of Passage
  • Language – English (interview), song itself (Korean)
  • Country where Item is from – South Korea

Informant Data:

DongHyun Lee is a 23-year old male from South Korea. He is currently a sophomore at University of Hong Kong. He has served in the Republic of Korea (ROK) Marine Corps from June 23rd 2014 to March 22nd 2016. He was stationed in a battalion in Yeong Pyeong Island, one of the northern most islands closer to North Korea than South Korea. His job was a machine gun marksmen for the first half of his service time and a cook for the second half.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context – DongHyun Lee was interviewed over Skype because he is currently located in Hong Kong. He went on his first regular leave after 3 months of service. It was the first time he returned to society since he started his service. His parents were in Shanghai, China so he stayed with his grandparents. He recalls it was one of the happiest few days in his life.
  • Cultural Context – In the South Korean military, not just in the marine corps, the first regular leave of a soldier has a special meaning, not just in military culture but also in society in general (because most Korean males serve due to conscription). The first leave means returning home and meeting family and friends for the first time since enlisting. The nature of conscription makes this a very special time for not just the soldier for those around him.

Item:

  • Ssa-ga (translated as unofficial chant). It is a tradition among ROK marines. The song’s origins are unclear but different variations are very much alive and well-transmitted in different ROK marine units. Ssa-ga is actually a collection of different songs sung in different occasions. The informant’s recollection and recitation was the first-leave ssa-ga, which had to be sung to a marine’s parents right in the place and the time the soldier meets his parents on the first day of the first leave. The informant was a special case in that he had to sing it through Skype since his parents were in Shanghai, China (his comrades most usually sang it in public places e.g. bus terminal).

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Transcript of Associated File:

Korean original version (English translation each line below)

신병위로휴가가 – The New Soldier First Leave Ssaga

어두운 밤하늘에 팔각모쓰고, 골목길을 걸어갈 때에

Under the dark night with my 8-pointer on, when I’m walking in the alley

저 멀리 어머니 나와계신다 못난 아들 마중하려고

I see my mama standing in the dark, waiting to greet this ingrateful son

어머니 어머니 울지마세요 울지말고 들어가세요

Mother, Mother, please don’t cry. Please go back inside.

다음에 이 다음에 전역하거든 못한 효도 다 할게요

Next time, next time when I get discharged, I will do my best to make up for the lost time

Informant’s Comments:

Informant was a little embarassed to sing this and thought it was a little funny that he had to sing it over skype. In fact, he was the only one in his company at the time to have sung the Ssa-ga this way. One of his comrades sang it in front of his parents the Incheon Freight terminal packed with people.

Collector’s Comments:

The texture of the song is lost in translation, but the original audio is attached for those interested. It is an interesting combination of a verbal folklore that also serves as a customary folklore that has meanings as a rites of passage: for the first time the marine presents himself with his military identity to those who have known him only as his civilian self.

Collector’s Name:

Jeong Tae Bang

Hymn/Song

Title: Hymn/Song

Informant info: Michael Rodriguez. Informant attends Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH as a United States Army Veteran. Informant enlisted in the Army in 2003 and was a member of the 1st Battalion 8th Marines Bravo Company, which is an infantry military unit. He was stationed out of camp Lejeune North Carolina. Informant served in Iraq from June 2004 to December 2004. He was awarded a Purple Heart. He was from a military family, as well. Informant is 31 years old.

Type of lore: Verbal Lore, Oaths, Traditions

Language: English

Country of Origin: USA

Social / Cultural Context: Informant was asked if there were any traditions that he remembered and reported that these two were very traditional oaths to learn. The Marine Corps Hymn and the Rifleman’s Creed.

Associated file:

Traditional Songs/Oaths

Transcript:

“When you’re like in the marine corps like. I don’t know, I cant, I cant recall any songs that were passed around, but there is the marine corps hymn. Which is like the marine corps song. Um, we call it the marine corps hymn. It’s like you know it starts out like ‘The halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli’ like these great things that the marine corps has done over the years. It sort of glorifies it. Um, there’s that, and there’s also this thing called the rifleman’s creed, which might be interesting to look up. Its sort of a, ah, like an oath that you say to yourself. You learn in bootcamp but you kind of carries on into infantry cause were just you do a lot more obviously with, uh, rifles and stuff. But uh sort like this, uh, creed to emphasize like the bond between a person and their weaponry.”

Collector’s comments: They are separate oaths. The rifleman’s creed is for more specific positions.

Informant’s comments: He claimed that the rifleman’s creed got more prevalent in infantry.

Tags/Keywords: Creed, Hymn, Song, Verbal Lore

 

Sorority Welcome Song

Welcome Song Initiation/Ritual

  • Informant Info
    • Sophomore Year of Dartmouth College
  • Type of Lore
    • Verbal
  • Language
    • English
  • Country of Origin
    • United States
  • Social / Cultural Context
    • Dartmouth Sorority
  • Informant’s Comments
    • Taken very light-hearted. The sorority and those who wish to partake sing a welcome song to new members that replaces the lyrics of notorious “Sweet Home Alabama” with lyrics that are unique to the sorority. Only members of the sorority sing the song.
  • Collector’s Comments
    • Anonymity in order to not reveal identity of fraternity and informant. The seriousness with which the songs are treated varied greatly between southern houses and Dartmouth. The amount of time and material coordination was directionally proportional to seriousness/geographic location.
    • See “Bid Chant” post for example videos of sorority welcome songs

The First Infantry Song

Title: The First Infantry Song

Informant info: Informant name is Jason Laackmann. Jason is twenty-eight years old and attends Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH as a United States Army Veteran. Jason served in the Army for five years in active duty and continues to serve in the Minnesota National Guard. The locations in which he has served are Fort Bend, Georgia, Fort Riley, Kansas, and overseas in Eastern Afghanistan.

Type of lore: Verbal Folklore, Songs, Lyrics

Language: English

Country of Origin: USA

Social / Cultural Context: Jason was interviewed at Dartmouth College. Jason was asked if he remembered any songs that they would sing during his training or time in the Army. He was asked to sing these songs out loud, but was too shy and sent the lyrics to me via email instead.

Associated File: There is no recorded video as Jason has sent me these lyrics via email.

Transcript:  [I have recorded the item exactly how it was sent to me in the email]:

Below are a few running/marching cadences. Also listed are the army song and the first infantry doctors song, which we sang every morning. Let me know if you need more.

The first infantry division song:

Toast of the Army,

Favorite Son! Hail to the brave Big Red One!

Always the first to thirst for a fight.

No foe shall challenge our right to victory.

We take the field, A grand sight to see.

Pride of the Infantry.

Men of a great division,

Courage is our tradition,

Forward the Big Red One!

Informant’s comments: Jason mentioned that he would sing this song every morning before they would begin their day. He also stated that each infantry had their own specific song.

Collector’s comments: Although Jason was hesitant to sing the songs out loud, he was more than willing to provide the lyrics and share this song with me.

Music as Communication in the Classroom: “Days of the Week”

“Days of the Week”

Informant information:

Lauren Grant is a 20 year old woman from Andover Massachusetts. She attends school at Quinnipiac University in an occupational therapy program. She has worked at the Recreational Education Center, an after school and summer care program for children with special needs, for the past four years. She has sent some examples of songs that the teachers use to engage with the students during “circle time”.

Type of lore: Verbal

Language: English

Country of Origin: United States of America

Social / Cultural Context:

At the Recreational Education Center in Peabody, Massachusetts, an after-school and summer care program for children with special needs, the following songs are sung by teachers of children with special needs in order to engage with the students. The students sing these songs along with the teachers. They are sung during “circle time”, which is an activity in which the the entire day center joins together, and all of the kids and teachers do an activity together instead of working one-on-one. It is a period for learning and socializing.

Transcript: 

Days of the week *clap clap*

Days of the week *clap clap*

Days of the week, days of the week, days of the week *clap clap*

There’s Sunday and there’s Monday,

There’s Tuesday and there’s Wednesday,

There’s Thursday and there’s Friday,

And then there’s Saturday!

Days of the week *clap clap*

Days of the week *clap clap*

Days of the week, days of the week, days of the week *clap clap*

Informant’s comments:

This song is sung to the tune of the “Addams Family” theme song.

Collector’s comments:

We categorized this piece of folklore under verbal lore because it is sung. This song is authorless, it also contains repetition and rhyme for easy memorization. This song is specific to this center for children with special needs. Such a simple concept as the names and sequences of the days of the week can be difficult for these children to grasp, which is why the song was created. This song especially has clapping in it – this invokes interaction from the children and helps develop a communication channel between them and their teachers.

Tags/Keywords: Song, Music, Special needs

Club Team “Fight Song”

1. Title: Maryland Club Team “Fight Song”
2. Informant: Catherine (Katie) Harmon (19) has just completed her freshman year while swimming for the club team at the University of Maryland in College Park, MD.  UMD does not have a varsity collegiate team so they receive some preferential treatment as far as facilities useage when compared to other club teams.  Katie has swum competitively in MD for most of her life starting on a local neighborhood summer team, then a small local club team, eventually a high school team, and now the UMD club team.
3. Customary: Ritual
4. Language: English
5. Country of Origin: United States
6. Social / Cultural Context: Katie stated that every team at UMD does the same fight song to emphasize unity among the athletic teams at UMD.  Usually club teams do not have to participate in this tradition but since there is no varsity swim team, their team is encouraged to do so.
7. No audio, transcribed Skype interview.
8. Transcript:
“Maryland, we’re all behind you
Raise high the black and gold
for there is nothing half so glorious
as to see our team victorious
we’ve got the team boys
we’ve got the steam boys
so keep on fighting don’t give in
M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D maryland will win!
(and then three rounds of GO MARYLAND! with fake drum noises)”
9. Informant’s comments: Every varsity team and Katie’s club team perform this distinctive fight song
10. Collector’s comments: I have seen the Maryland football team perform this fight song when watching games on TV.
11. Tags/Keywords: Pre-Meet, Ritual, Fight Song

Music as Communication in the Classroom: “What’s the Weather?”

“What’s the Weather?”

Informant information:

Lauren Grant is a 20 year old woman from Andover Massachusetts. She attends school at Quinnipiac University in an occupational therapy program. She has worked at the Recreational Education Center in Peabody, Massachusetts, an after school and summer care program for children with special needs, for the past four years. She has sent some examples of songs that the teachers use to engage with the students during “circle time”, a special period of peer-oriented activity in the course of their day.

Type of lore: Verbal

Language: English

Country of Origin: United States of America

Social / Cultural Context:

At the Recreational Education Center in Massachusetts, an after-school and summer care program for children with special needs, the following songs are sung by teachers of children with special needs in order to engage with the students. The students sing these songs along with the teachers. They are sung during “circle time”, which is an activity in which the the entire day center joins together, and all of the kids and teachers do an activity together instead of working one-on-one. It is a period for learning and socializing.

Transcript:

What’s the weather,
What’s the weather,
What’s the weather like today?
Is it sunny, is it cloudy?
What’s the weather like today?

Informant’s comments:

This song is sung to the tune of “Oh my Darling Clementine”.

After the song is performed, “one of the children is picked to describe the weather. They are given choices of hot, cold, sunny, cloudy, rainy, windy or snowing. They point to or pick up signs and leave them on the board for the rest of the day.”

Collector’s comments:

This folklore is important to children with special needs because of the way it teaches them about the weather and helps them to communicate. It has a clear purpose, which is to help the children learn another complex topic that is difficult for them to comprehend. This song is authorless, taught to the children by their teachers, and uses a lot of repetition, participation and images to keep the children engaged.

Tags/Keywords: Song, Children, Special needs

Music as Communication in the Classroom: The Beginning and Conclusion of “Circle Time”

The Beginning and Conclusion of “Circle Time”

Informant information: 

Lauren Grant is a 20 year old woman from Andover Massachusetts. She attends school at Quinnipiac University in an occupational therapy program. She has worked at the Recreational Education Center, an after school and summer care program for children with special needs, for the past four years. She has sent some examples of songs that the teachers use to engage with the students during “circle time”.

Type of lore: Verbal

Language: English

Country of Origin: United States of America

Social / Cultural Context:

  • At the Recreational Education Center in Peabody, Massachusetts, an after-school and summer care program for children with special needs, the following songs are sung by teachers of children with special needs in order to engage with the students. The students sing these songs along with the teachers. They are sung during “circle time”, which is an activity in which the the entire day center joins together, and all of the kids and teachers do an activity together instead of working one-on-one. It is a period for learning and socializing.

“The Introduction Song”

Transcript:

“An Introduction Song”
It’s very nice to meet you,
Have a great, great day!
It’s very nice to meet you,
And this is what we say!
Shake my hand, shake my hand, shake my hand!

“Circle time is over”
Circle time is over now, over now, over now!
Circle time is over now,
It’s time for <insert next activity>

Informant’s comments:

Lauren stated that the first song is used as an “introduction song”

The second is sung at the end of circle time, to the tune of London Bridge is Falling Down. This song is used primarily as a transition into the next activity, which can be snack time, free-play, individual learning, etc.

Collector’s comments:

We categorized these pieces of folklore under verbal lore because they are sung. This folklore fits under the category of folklore from families with children with special needs because the children with special needs sing these songs along with their teachers. These songs are also authorless. They contain repetition and rhyme for easy memorization. These songs are specific to this center for children with special needs because of how they’re used on a daily basis. Transitions are often difficult for children with special needs to navigate, and the employment of these simple, repetitive songs at the beginning and conclusion of every “circle time” serves to signal to the children when they can expect a change.

Tags/Keywords: Song, Music, Special needs,