Tag Archives: superstition

If the Cows are Sitting

Title: If the Cows are Sitting

General Information

  • Sign superstition
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: United States
  • Informant: John Kurtz Sr.
  • Date Collected: May 19, 2019

Informant Data

  • John Kurtz is a fifty-five-year-old former business owner and current consultant. He currently lives in Philadelphia, but he was born and raised on a dairy farm in Morgantown, Pennsylvania. His family owned the farm for multiple generations, but it is no longer operational. He worked on the farm, doing chores and helping out from a young age, where he learned about the traditions of farmers and their workers.

Contextual data

  • Social Context
    • John first encountered this bit of farming folklore when he helped the workers on the farm as a child. As a young child, he helped with the smaller animals, such as the chickens. As he grew older, he began to work on larger projects with the farm workers, mending fences, repairing the barn, and moving bales of hay.
    • The workers would often tell tales among themselves while they worked as a form of entertainment, but the most common pieces of folklore were superstitions that either informed about the future or brought good luck to the farm. It is from these workers that John first encountered the collected item of folklore. The workers would observe the behavior of the animals they tended to predict the weather; a habit John picked up on while working on the farm.
  • Cultural Context
    • The observation of animal behavior to gather information about impending weather is a common farming practice. This practice originated from early American farmers, as they had no reliable way to predict the weather, even though the weather played a significant role in their lives. In order to plan their days, farmers needed some way to predict the weather, and so the practice of observing animals came into being as they seemed to be more in touch with nature than the farmers.

Item

  • “If the cows are sitting down, then it means that it is going to rain, because they are trying to save a warm, dry patch in the field for after the rain.”

Transcript:

Jack: “Can you tell me a little about some superstitions that you had on the farm?”

John: “When I was younger, the workers would often point out when the whole herd of cows was sitting down, and they would say that it meant that it was going to rain.”

Jack: “Do you know why that meant it was going to rain?”

John: “Well… the first time that I heard it, I didn’t understand what it meant, so I asked my dad to explain it to me, and he said, ‘If the cows are sitting down, then it means that it is going to rain, because they are trying to save a warm, dry patch in the field for after the rain.’ I’m not sure that he actually believed it, but the workers took the cows’ behavior very seriously.”

Jack: “Ok thanks, were there any other superstitions on the farm.”

John: “Not that I can remember, but if I think of anymore, I will let you know.”

Jack: “Ok, thank you.”

Collector Jack Kurtz (son of informant)

Chopsticks in Rice

Title: Chopsticks in Rice

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition (Bad luck)
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Korea
  • Informant: A.A.
  • Date Collected: November 10, 2018

Informant Data:

  • A.A. was born in Seoul, South Korea where he lived with his grandparents in the middle of the country. When he was three years old, J. moved to Tijuana, Mexico, before eventually immigrating to the United States and settling down in the Los Angeles, California area. Currently, J. is Junior undergraduate student at Dartmouth College. He is double majoring in Psychology and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:

    Whenever J. and his family would get together for dinner, one of the foods that they would consume often is rice. As J. finished his meal, he put down his chopsticks and placed them upright in the bowl in front of him. His mother, who noticed this, quickly grabbed the chopsticks out of the bit of rice left in the bowl and placed them on the table. She scolded J. for his actions and told him to never put his chopsticks in his rice bowl in the upright position. Confused, J. asked his mother why she did that. She explained that by putting the chopsticks upright, he was attracting ghosts and other unclean spirits into the house because it is reminiscent of incense that gets laid out for the dead. Frightened, J. never puts his chopsticks in a rice bowl in the upright position.

    Cultural Context:

    Korean cultures focus a lot on life after death and the soul of a person. This superstition is one that is true to belief as many Koreans still believe this today. Koreans believe that even after death, spirits and ghosts have the ability to come back to earth and live amongst living humans. Incense is one of the ways that spirits can come back to the world and communicate with people.

Item:

  • One is cursed with evil ghosts and spirits as a result of putting chopsticks in a bowl of rice in the upright position. This is thought to be symbolic of incense, which is used to attract spirits and ghosts back to the world. By doing this improper action, the person is inviting unclean spirits and ghosts into their home, and causing bad luck to themselves.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Chopsticks in a Rice Bowl

Collector’s Comments:

  • The superstition of the evil eye is the most common Korean superstition that is still believed and practiced today. It resembles a deep spiritual belief in the afterlife. This is also an example of magic superstition.

Collector’s Name: Clay Han

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Chopsticks. Rice Bowl. Magic Superstition.

Crow vs. Magpie

Title: Crow vs. Magpie

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition (Bad luck vs. Good luck)
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Korea
  • Informant: Sunglim Kim
  • Date Collected: November 5, 2018

Informant Data:

  • Sunglim Kim was born and raised in Seoul, Korea until the age of 17. Her family origins are Korean. When she was a junior in high school she moved to the United States, and went to high school in Seattle, Washington. She then went to UC Berkeley for her undergraduate degree, went back to work in Korea for a few years, and then came back to the United States to get her masters degree at the University of Kansas, and then went back to Berkeley for her PHD. Currently, she is a professor of Korean Art and Culture, in the department of Art History at Dartmouth College. This is her 7th year teaching at Dartmouth College. She is a mother of two children.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:At a very young age (around the age of 6) Sunglim Kim’s friends told her about this superstition. This was a commonly held superstition that all of her friends also believed in. When she was younger she said that she used to believe in these superstitions, and if she saw a crow in the morning going to school it would give her a nervous pit in her stomach that something bad was going to happen. However, she says now that she does not believe in these superstitions. But she will still say that it is a good omen when she sees a magpie.
  • Cultural Context:This folklore is widely held in Korean culture, although our informants did not know when this originated. This folklore originated in Korea. However, there are others cultures that associate the crow with folklore. In India for instance, the crow represents their ancestors, so it is not a bad omen. In Japan and America however, the crow is also associated with a bad omen, but not necessarily bad luck. There is also other folklore tied to these birds in Korean culture as well, Sunglim Kim described. For instance, there is a story about a boy saving a magpie from a snake. The snake then got mad at the boy and tried to attack him, but the magpie got involved and sacrificed itself for the boy. This story represents the magpie as the weak yet good person that doesn’t harm anyone else.

Item:

  • If you see a crow cawing it is considered to bring you bad luck, however, if you see a magpie singing, it is considered to bring you good luck and possibly will bring good guests to visit your house.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Transcript of Associated File:

  • “There are two black birds. Crow is Bad Luck, but Magpie will bring good luck, or good guests will come to the house.”

Informants Comments:

  • The informant said that she believed in this folklore when she was a kid, however, she no longer believes in this folklore.

Collector’s Comments:

  • This folklore was interesting to me because Sunglim Kim did not still believe in the bad luck and good luck associated from seeing these birds, yet she admitted that she would still have positive thought associated with magpies and negative thoughts associated with crows. This shows how folklore will engrain an idea into peoples heads, even if they are not conscious of this belief. This piece of folklore is a Sign Superstition, which means if A, then B. So if you see a magpie, it brings good luck. Whereas if you see a crow, it brings bad luck.

Collector’s Name: Kipling Weisel

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Crow. Magpie. Good Luck. Bad Luck. Sign Superstition.

Blabbermouth

Title: Blabbermouth

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition (Bad Luck)
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Korea
  • Informant: A.A.
  • Date Collected: November 10, 2018

Informant Data:

  • A.A. was born in Seoul, South Korea where he lived with his grandparents in the middle of the country. When he was three years old, J. moved to Tijuana, Mexico, before eventually immigrating to the United States and settling down in the Los Angeles, California area. Currently, J. is Junior undergraduate student at Dartmouth College. He is double majoring in Psychology and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:

    As a child, J. tended to be extremely sassy and talk a lot. As a means of getting J. to talk less, his mother told him that if he kept talking as much as he did, and did not quiet down when told to, a frog would jump out his mouth. J. did not believe this. One night, though, when J. was 5 years old, his mother made a traditional Korean dish that was comprised mainly of spinach. As usual, J. was talking his mother’s ear off, when she asked him to quiet down. When he did not do so, his mother reminded him about the frog, but this did not work either. Suddenly, his mother turned to him and spit out a clump of spinach, which J. thought was a frog. Freaked out by the incident which he had just witnessed, J. was permanently scarred from the incident and did not speak out against his mother again.

  • Cultural Context:

    Korean cultures are very communalists, and respect is a large part of society. Listening to ones elders and being respectful of their rules and traditions is taken very seriously in Korean, as well as most Asian cultures. This superstition is one that is used to control a child’s behavior and have them learn to respect their elders, as well as reinforce these values.

Item:

  • One is cursed with the a frog in the mouth if that person refuses to be quiet or talks back to an elder. In this case, the frog is bad luck and caused by such actions if the person does not change their attitude.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Blabbermouth MP4

Informants Comments:

  • “You don’t want to speak out when a teacher is talking especially, or when your parents are talking because you don’t want to be talking over them. You want to show some level of respect.”

Collector’s Comments:

  • This is a common superstition utilized by Korean parents to discipline their kids. This is an example of a sign superstition.

Collector’s Name: Clay Han

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Frog. Sign Superstition. Blabbermouth. Talking.

Throwing Salt When Returning from a Funeral

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Korea
  • Informant: Sunglim Kim
  • Date Collected: November 5, 2018

Informant Data:

  • Sunglim Kim was born and raised in Seoul, Korea until the age of 17. Her family origins are Korean. When she was a junior in high school she moved to the United States, and went to high school in Seattle, Washington. She then went to UC Berkeley for her undergraduate degree, went back to work in Korea for a few years, and then came back to the United States to get her masters degree at the University of Kansas, and then went back to Berkeley for her PHD. Currently, she is a professor of Korean Art and Culture, in the department of Art History at Dartmouth College. This is her 7thyear teaching at Dartmouth College. She is a mother of two children.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:When Sunglim Kim was 13 years old, and living in Seoul, Korea, her dad left for a funeral without her mom, and when he came back, her mom performed the superstition explained in the item below. She knew that this was a common practice in her culture beforehand. However, this was the first time she witnessed someone practicing this superstition. She agrees that it was a good idea and it was something that her family continued to do frequently, and Sunglim Kim continues to practice this today. Sunglim Kim also explained that women usually do not go to funerals, so her mom would usually be at home whenever her dad went to a funeral. This is because her mom normally needed to look after her and tend to domestic duties.
  • Cultural Context:Women in general usually did not attend funerals. This was because they would need to stay home and tend to their kids and other domestic duties. Women who are pregnant especially do not go to funerals, because women did not want to see anything negative during a time of pregnancy, with the idea that this might bring bad things into their child’s life. This superstition originated in Korean culture, and it was a very much engrained and a traditional part of their culture. It was a superstition accepted by most households, according to Sunglim Kim, and also accepted by all ages.

Item:

  • When someone comes back from a funeral, which is usually the man or husband, the family member at home will throw salt on them as they enter the door to ensure that they do not carry with them any spirits of the dead into the house. Spirits of the dead that entered the house could potentially be harmful, and bring more death or negative things to the family. The salt would remove the dead spirits, and maintain the purity of the person and the house.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Transcript of Associated File:

  • “Whenever my father came back from funerals, and then my mother, before he entered, would always put some salt around him.”

Informants Comments:

  • Sunglim Kim believed this to be an important superstition to abide by when someone returned to the house after a funeral. She said that normally her mom did not go to the funerals, so it was usually her mom that was throwing salt on her dad when he returned.

Collector’s Comments:

  • I thought this was a very interesting superstition because it demonstrates gender roles within Korean culture. It was traditionally the man that was going to the funerals and the woman that stayed at home. This shows that the women’s duties are very much valued, and women can’t get much time off from tending to their kids. Also, it shows that pregnant women are treated very well in the time of pregnancy since pregnant women were not allowed to go to funerals since they were not meant to see anything negative in the time of pregnancy. This is also an example of a Conversion Superstition, which means if A, then B, unless C. So in this case, if the husband goes to a funeral, then he will bring spirits of the dead with him back to the house unless he gets salt put on him.

Collector’s Name: Kipling Weisel

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Throwing Salt on Husband. Conversion Superstition.

Touching Butterflies, Touching Your Eye

Title: Touching Butterflies, Touching Your Eye

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition (Bad Luck)
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: South Korea
  • Informant: Jamie Park
  • Date Collected: November 5, 2018

Informant Data:

  • Jamie Park was born in New York City, New York on October 22, 1997. Jamie lived in New York for a short time with her parents and sister, until they moved to Seoul, South Korea, where her parents initially immigrated from. The Park’s time in Seoul was brief and eventually they moved back to the United States, settling down in Rancho Palos Verdes, where Jamie grew up until she graduated from Palos Verdes Peninsula High School. Currently, Jamie is a Junior undergraduate student at Dartmouth college, majoring in Studio art, with the hopes of going to medical school upon graduating. In addition, Jamie makes frequent visits to South Korea, as her parents moved back to Seoul in August 2018.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:

    As a young girl, Jamie would often go around her yard and chase the butterflies that were flying around the gardens. Jamie’s grandma would yell at her in Korean to stop trying to catch the butterflies, because by touching the butterfly’s wings, if she were to touch her eye thereafter, she would go blind. Jamie’s grandmother would warn her that the butterfly’s wing contained a sort of magical dust that would spread into her eyes, and thus cause her to go blind.

  • Cultural Context:

    This superstition is one that has been around for centuries. This superstition has lost popularity, though, especially in recent years, but is still practiced in Korean culture today. In addition to being bad luck and causing blindness, the practical implication of this superstition has been to discourage eye infections by not touching your eye after putting your fingers on a foreign object. Thus, this superstition is not only to avoid bad luck, but also to avoid real health risks.

  • One can become blind by touching the wings of a butterfly and then proceeding to touch their eye. Koreans believe that this magical dust on the butterfly’s wings had the ability to cause blindness in people if it found its way into the human eye.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Collector’s Comments:

  • The superstition of the evil eye is not as popular as most other superstitions in Korean society. The superstition still has a roll in promoting good health. This is an example of magic superstition.

Collector’s Name: Clay Han

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Butterfly. Eye. Magic Superstition.

Don’t Cut Finger Nails at Night

Title: Cutting Finger Nails at Night

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Japan
  • Informant: Sunglim Kim
  • Date Collected: November 5, 2018

Informant Data:

  • Sunglim Kim was born and raised in Seoul, Korea until the age of 17. Her family origins are Korean. When she was a junior in high school she moved to the United States, and went to high school in Seattle, Washington. She then went to UC Berkeley for her undergraduate degree, went back to work in Korea for a few years, and then came back to the United States to get her masters degree at the University of Kansas, and then went back to Berkeley for PHD. Currently, she is a professor of Korean Art and Culture, in the department of Art History at Dartmouth College. This is her 7thyear teaching at Dartmouth College. She is a mother of two children.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:When Sunglim Kim was young (around the age of 5 years old) she remembers wanting to cut her toenails one night, but her mom came in and stopped her because of this superstition. Sunglim Kim was ignorant to this superstition at the time, and this was the first time that her mom explained the superstition that will be described in the item section below. Sunglim Kim was terrified by the superstition, and it prevented her from cutting her toe nails or finger nails at night for the rest of her youth. She had terrible nightmares about rats turning into monsters and haunting her because of this superstition. She said that most of her friends at the time believed in the superstition as well when they were young, so they also did not cut their toe nails at night. Sunglim Kim now will cut her toenails at night, because she no longer believes in this superstition. However, she will always make sure that the lights are on when cutting her nails, to make sure that her nails do not get on the ground.
  • Cultural Context:This superstition is deeply prevalent in Korean culture. It is a variant of a similar Japanese superstition about cutting fingernails at night.

Item:

  • If you cut your toe nails or fingernails at night then rats will eat the toe nails off of the ground. The rats that now have a piece of you will be able to transform into you, and also can take your soul. Cutting toenails in the daytime is acceptable, but it is still important to not leave any toe nail clippings on the ground, since the rats will still be able to eat them at night.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Transcript of Associated File:

  • “They don’t allow me cut my nails, like toe nails or finger nails at night. And they said, the rats will eat them, and they can transform into you.”

Informants Comments:

  • The informant was very confident about the fact that this was a widely held belief. She believed in the superstition for a while when she was young, and said that all of her friends believed in it as well. She then stopped believing in it when she was older, around the age of 11 she said.

Collector’s Comments:

  • I found this superstition very interesting and entertaining. I was surprised by how widely held a belief it was in Korean culture, and that it had crossover from Japanese culture. It is an example of contagious magic in Korean culture, however in Japanese culture it is not an example of contagious magic. In Japanese culture, the variation is that if you cut your fingernails at night, then it opens up a way for bad spirits to enter your body through the fresh cut in your fingernails. In Japanese folklore, bad spirits are only around at night, so that is why you should not cut fingernails at night.

Collector’s Name: Kipling Weisel

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Cutting Fingernails. Contagious Magic.

Ugly Dumplings

Title: Ugly Dumplings

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition (Bad luck)
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Korea
  • Informant: Jamie Park
  • Date Collected: October 17, 2018

Informant Data:

  • Jamie Park was born in New York City, New York on October 22, 1997. Jamie lived in New York for a short time with her parents and sister, until they moved to Seoul, South Korea, where her parents initially immigrated from. The Park’s time in Seoul was brief and eventually they moved back to the United States, settling down in Rancho Palos Verdes, where Jamie grew up until she graduated from Palos Verdes Peninsula High School. Currently, Jamie is a Junior undergraduate student at Dartmouth college, majoring in Studio art, with the hopes of going to medical school upon graduating. In addition, Jamie makes frequent visits to South Korea, as her parents moved back to Seoul in August 2018.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:

    Whenever Jamie get together with her entire family, whether it be for the holidays or social gatherings, they always make mandu, which are Korean dumplings. This traditional Korean dish is made with a beef or pork filling, with the outer dumpling pressed together by hand. Whenever Jamie would make this with her grandmother or mother, they would always remind her to make sure that she paid special attention to the ways in which she was making the dumplings. Both Jamie’s mother and grandmother informed her that the dumplings needed to look nice, as the appearance of the dumplings would have an effect on the appearance of her future children. They would tell her that if her dumplings looked good, her kids would be pretty, but if the dumplings were poorly made, her children would be ugly. Jamie took heed of this warning, and to this day, although she does completely believe in the superstition, still jokingly practices the idea of making pretty dumplings for the sake of her future children.

  • Cultural Context:

    This superstition is one that is not only common amongst Koreans, but many Asian cultures around the world. Like many Korean superstitions, the superstition surrounding the making of mandu is one that is handed down to children from elders. This superstition is also used as a means of disciplining children, as to not rush the process of making dumplings, but rather to take their time and pay attention to details.

Item:

  • If someone does not properly prepare their dumplings when making mandu, the product of their dumplings will have an effect on the development of their children. So, if one makes an good-looking dumpling, their children will be good looking, but if they make an ugly dumpling, their children will be ugly.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Informants Comments:

  • “I don’t really believe in this superstition now like I did when I was a child, but I still remember it whenever I make mandu.”

Collector’s Comments:

  • The superstition of the making of dumplings is still active amongst many Asian cultures today. It is passed down from elders to children and is an example of magic superstitions.

Collector’s Name: Clay Han

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. Ugly Dumplings. Magic Superstition.

The Number 4

Title: The Number 4

General Information about Item:

  • Customary Folklore: Korean Superstition (Bad luck)
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: Korea/Chinese
  • Informant: Sunglim Kim
  • Date Collected: November 5, 2018

Informant Data:

  • Sunglim Kim was born and raised in Seoul, Korea until the age of 17. Her family origins are Korean. When she was a junior in high school she moved to the United States, and went to high school in Seattle, Washington. She then went to UC Berkeley for her undergraduate degree, went back to work in Korea for a few years, and then came back to the United States to get her masters degree at the University of Kansas, and then went back to Berkeley for PHD. Currently, she is a professor of Korean Art and Culture, in the department of Art History at Dartmouth College. This is her 7th year teaching at Dartmouth College. 

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context:

    As a young girl growing up in South Korea, Sunglim noticed that many of the elevators in buildings were missing the number 4 on the buttons that are to be pressed to go up to different floors. In place of the number 4, Sunglim noticed that many elevators either used the letter “F” or omitted the number all together. She was told by her mother that the number 4 was bad luck, and would not be used in places like elevators, or in buildings to denote the fourth floor. She was told that any use of the number 4 would bring upon her bad luck and even death.

  • Cultural Context: The bad omen surrounding the curse of the Evil eye is undoubtedly one of the most popular and commonly-practiced Greek superstitions. The origins of the Evil Eye date back to 100 AD with the works of Plutarch, a Greek biographer. He claims that the eyes are the primary source of the deadly spells cast by evil individuals. While Plutarch struggled to explain the phenomenon, Pliny the Elder stated that some individuals have the, “power of fascination with the eyes and can even kill those on whom they fix their gaze.” Today, the evil eye superstition exists in distinct variations across cultures, and it is common for believers to make efforts to protect themselves and their families against the curse.

Item:

  • One is cursed with the Evil Eye as a result of another person’s stare, comments, or praises. It is most commonly placed upon someone through a malevolent glare; however, it is possible for an individual to curse himself by looking at his reflection or acting a certain way. The Evil Eye is thought to cause harm, misfortune, and bad luck.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Collector’s Comments:

  • The superstition of the number 4 is one that is common in not only Korean culture, but also in Chinese culture. This is a superstition that is still practiced in Korean society today. This is an example of sign superstitions.

Collector’s Name: Clay Han

Tags/Keywords:

  • Korean. Superstition. The Number 4. Bad Luck. Sign Superstition.

Celebrating Birthday Early

General Information about Item:

  • Bad Luck Superstition
  • Language: English/Hindi
  • Country of Origin: India
  • Informant: Aashika Jhawar
  • Date Collected: 11-5-2018
  • Interview was done over phone

Informant Data:

  • Aashika (Aashi) Jhawar is a 19 year old college student from Bellevue, WA. She was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan and currently attends the University of California, Berkeley. She is second generation American and her family is from Northern India.

Contextual Data:

  • Cultural Context: In Indian culture, modesty is considered a core value and character is often measured by one’s restraint towards temptations. This dates back to the Laws of Manu, a Hindu law code circa 100 BCE-200 CE, where men had to guard themselves against life’s temptations. This cultural ideal relates to this superstition because celebrating a birthday early suggests arrogance that a person will live until their next birthday.
  • Social Context: Aashi learned this superstition from her mother and grandmother. She says that her family believes in this superstition and is sure not to give birthday presents or have birthday celebrations early.

Item:

  • It is considered bad luck in Indian culture to celebrate a birthday early, as it suggests overconfidence in ones lifespan.

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Transcript:

  • “An example of a bad omen in indian culture is celebrating a birthday or really any holiday beforehand. It signals that the birthday might not arrive since you’ve already celebrated it or something along those lines, and for that reason, people in India never really celebrate holidays early.”

Informant’s Comments:

  • Aashi stated that this superstition is relatively simple and straightforward, but she follows it closely. She recounted one experience where she was not able to give her sister a birthday present because it was a few days before her birthday, and it would be unlucky for her sister.

Collector’s Comments:

  • Unlike many other superstitions in Indian culture, this one seems to be rooted in morality rather than religion. I have heard of a similar practice in Judaism and I’m sure it exists in many other cultures that have modesty as a core value.

Collector’s Name: Derek Lue