Category Archives: Food

Pig Roast

Title: Pig Roast

General Information about Item:

  • Type: Food Lore
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: United States
  • Informant: FO&M Roofer (#9 informant consent form)
  • Date Collected: 2/23/18

Informant Data:

  • He is a worker for the Roofing Department in FO&M here at Dartmouth. He has been at Dartmouth for over 25 years and is the last worker in his department who has not retired, though works with other FO&M employees. He carries a strong passion for keeping Dartmouth in tip top shape. Being assigned to the same fraternity for 25+ years has allowed him to form long lasting connections with the brothers that come and go.

Contextual Data:

  • The Theta Delta Chi fraternity hosts several barbecues every year. The informant, responsible for certain operations of the fraternity, has been working these pig roasts for over two decades. It’s during events like these that have allowed the informant to extend into a folk group with Dartmouth students.

Item:

  • With help from other FO&M employees, he hauls in a big smoker in the morning and begins his preparation. The first step is to fill the grill with hard wood to make coals–a process that takes between four and six hours. After the coals are ready, he puts the pig in the smoker which can take 7-12 hours. When it is finally ready, people pick off meat and have the option to take some of his wife’s homemade barbecue sauce and bread. The sauce consists of barbecue sauce, ketchup, onions, garlic, and other secret ingredients. The bread is made with real Vermont maple syrup. In the end, the employees and the brothers of the frat can enjoy this tradition with friends and family for hours into the night.

Informant’s Comments:

  • “My wife’s sauce is dangerously good.”

Collector’s Comments:

  • This tradition combines the FO&M employee folk group with a fraternity folk group here at Dartmouth. The informant explained that the sense of camaraderie he feels within the brotherhood is what keeps him so closely involved in running the pig roasts every year.

Collector’s Name: Harlan Smart

Tags/Keywords:

  • Food Lore
  • Barbecue

The Hop Fry

Title: The Hop Fry

General Information About this Item:

  • Food lore or Material Lore
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: United States
  • Informant Number: 12
  • Date Collected: 2/23/18

Informant Data:

  • High level manager within DDS. Has been at Dartmouth for nearly 40 years and has worked with the areas today known as the Hop, Collis Cafe, and 53’ Commons.

Contextual Data:

  • When the Hop was founded nearly 55 years ago they needed a way to set themselves apart from the other dining establishments on campus.  When my informant started out at Dartmouth, he was working in the Hop and was in a managerial role there and that is where he collected the folklore.

Item:

  • Material Lore and Food Lore, when the Hop was founded nearly 55 years ago it needed a way to separate itself from the other dining establishments on campus.  They began to use a special seasoning on their fries, which has now become a staple on all fries served at the hop dating back to the 1980s.  The seasoning used on the fries was unique to the Hop and helped separate themselves from the other dining establishments.

Transcript:

“The Hop Fry helped distinguish itself from the rest of the food establishments on campus..”

Informant’s Comments:

Was used by the Hop to distinguish themselves from the other establishments on campus. An item of food unique to the hop and one in which people who worked at the Hop or ate the Hop were proud of.

Collector’s Comments:

  • Clear example of Material or Food Lore
  • An item of food that has been celebrated by a group of people for its significance and distinguishing qualities
  • We could call this a the Hop’s distinguishing item of food

Collector’s Name: C. Ross Wood

Tags/Keywords:

  • Food Lore
  • Material Folklore
  • DDS

Traditional Chinese Meal

Title: Traditional Chinese Meal

General Information about Item:

  • Genre and Sub Genre: Familial Folklore
  • Language: English
  • Country where Item is from: China

Informant Data:

  • Marshall Peng provided us with what his family eats every year for Christmas Dinner. He is 19 years old, currently a ’20 at Dartmouth College and lives in Wisconsin. Both his parents originate from China. Tyler’s family practices Christianity.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context: On large holidays families typically have a traditional meal that they will make for that holiday. Christmas is no exception as all of the people we interviewed spoke about a traditional meal that they have every Christmas.
  • Cultural Context: Steamed Dumplings is a very popular Chinese dish. Marshall’s parents are both from China and they brought this traditional meal to the U.S. and incorporated with their celebration of Christmas.

Item:

  • His mother makes his favorite meal, steamed dumplings. She makes this every single year and he has eaten it every Christmas he can remember. It is traditionally a Chinese New Year dish but his mother makes it for Christmas.

Collector’s Name: Clay Chatham

Tags/Keywords:

  • Food, Tradition, Christmas,

Traditional Jamaican Meal

Title: Traditional Jamaican Meal

General Information about Item:

  • Genre and Sub Genre: Familial Folklore
  • Language: English
  • Country where Item is from: Jamaica

Informant Data:

  • Tyler Neath provided us with what his family eats every year for Christmas Dinner. He is 19 years old, currently a ’21 at Dartmouth College and lives in Jamaica. Both his parents originate from Jamaica. Tyler’s family practices Christianity

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context: On large holidays families typically have a traditional meal that they will make for that holiday. Christmas is no exception as all of the people we interviewed spoke about a traditional meal that they have every Christmas.
  • Cultural Context: Jerk chicken, cormeny porridge. This is a very popular dish Jamaica.  Tyler and his parents are from Jamaica and they make this meal at home to celebrate Christmas.

Item:

  • His mother makes his favorite meal, Jerk chicken and cormeny porridge for Christmas dinner. She makes this every single year and he has eaten it every Christmas he can remember.

Collector’s Name: Clay Chatham

Tags/Keywords:

  • Food, Tradition, Christmas,

Traditional American Meal 1

Title: Traditional American Meal 1

General Information about Item:

  • Genre and Sub Genre: Familial Folklore
  • Language: English
  • Country where Item is from: United States

Informant Data:

  • Austen Michel provided us with what his family eats every year for Christmas Dinner. He is 20 years old, currently a ’20 at Dartmouth College and lives in Boston Massachusetts. Both his parents are from America. His father is from Boston and mother is from Louisiana. They practice Christianity.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context: On large holidays families typically have a traditional meal that they will make for that holiday. Christmas is no exception as all of the people we interviewed spoke about a traditional meal that they have every Christmas.
  • Cultural Context: Eating Chinese food for Christmas dinner is common with families practicing judaism.  This is largely due to the fact that most restaurants close down for the holidays, but those who do not celebrate Christmas remain open.

Item:

  • His family goes to a Chinese restaurant for Christmas dinner. They do this every single year for Christmas.

Collector’s Name: Clay Chatham

Tags/Keywords:

  • Food, Tradition, Christmas,

Traditional Greek Meal

Title: Traditional Greek Meal

General Information about Item:

  • Genre and Sub Genre: Familial Folklore
  • Language: English
  • Country where Item is from: Greece

Informant Data:

  • Katherine Spanos provided us with what her family eats every year for Christmas. She is 19 years old, currently a ’20 at Dartmouth College and lives in Hummelstown Pennsylvania. Her father is from Greece and her mother is from the USA. Her family practices Greek Orthodoxy

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context: On large holidays families typically have a traditional meal that they will make for that holiday. Christmas is no exception as all of the people we interviewed spoke about a traditional meal that they have every Christmas.
  • Cultural Context: Pastitsio is a very popular Greek dish. Katherine’s father is from Greece and brought this traditional meal to America. Her father makes this dish for her family to celebrate Christmas

Item:

  • Her father makes her favorite Greek dish, Pastitsio, for Christmas Dinner. He makes this every single year and she has eaten it every Christmas she can remember

 

Associated file (a video, audio, or image file):

Collector’s Name: Clay Chatham

Tags/Keywords:

  • Greek, Food, Tradition, Christmas

Traditional Indian Christmas Meal

Title: Traditional Indian Christmas Meal

General Information about Item:

  • Genre and Sub Genre: Familial Folklore
  • Language: English
  • Country where Item is from: India

Informant Data:

  • Sai Davuluri provided us with what his family eats every year for Christmas Dinner. He is 18 years old, currently a ’21 at Dartmouth College and lives in Merced California. Both his parents originate from Central/South India. Sai’s family practices Hinduism and does celebrate Christmas.

Contextual Data:

  • Social Context: On large holidays families typically have a traditional meal that they will make for that holiday. Christmas is no exception as all of the people we interviewed spoke about a traditional meal that they have every Christmas.
  • Cultural Context: Masala Dosa Is a very popular South Indian dish. Sai’s parents are both from South India and they brought this traditional meal to the U.S. and incorporated it into the americanized version of Christmas.

Item:

  • His mother makes his favorite Indian dish, Masala Dosa, for Christmas Eve dinner. She makes this every single year and has eaten it every Christmas he can remember.

Collector’s Comments:

  • It was interesting that Sai’s family practices Hinduism and celebrates and also celebrates a primarily christian holiday. They open their presents Christmas morning and eat chocolate chip pancakes. They also watch the movie Home Alone on Christmas day.

Collector’s Name: Clay Chatham

Tags/Keywords:

  • Food, Tradition, Christmas, Hinduism

“Snowball”

Snowball

Infromant: Brian Flint, age 23, Metairie, LA. Collected on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone

Verbal Lore: Folk Speech, slang- associated: material, food lore

English

United States of America

Context: a sweet treat made with finely shaved ice and sugary syrup served in a cup and popular in the summer, very similar to a snow cone

Transcript:

Infromant: Erin Fell, age 21, New Orleans,LA. colleceted on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone.

Transcript:

Next is “Snowball”, not the snowball that use in a snowball fight, but um, shaved ice. You put um, flavored syrups on top. It is a staple during the summer time.

Collectors Commentary:

Keywords: Snowball, New Orleans, shaved Ice, syrup, snow cone

Link

Verbal Lore: folk speach, slang- associated, Material, food lore

English

United States of America

Context:  A New Orleans sandwich served on french bread and traditionally containing some sort of meat, mayonaise, lettuce and tomato. Similar to a submarine sandwich. Name originally was “poor boy” then shortened to po’boy.

Informamnt:Libby Flint, age 59, New Orleans resident of 36 years, originally from Upstate New York and Vermont. Collected May 22, 2016 and recorded on iphone.

Transcript:

“ New Orleanians have many unique word related to their food. The ‘poboy sandwich’ is a submarine sandwich made on French bread, termed that because  a whole sandwich could feed a poor family.”

 

Informant:Brian Flint, age 23, Metairie, LA, collected on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone.

Transcript:

“The next one is ‘po’boy sandwich’, so that’s basically a New Orleans Style sandwich. They would have  these sandwiches served to- actually got their names from some streetcar drivers that were on strike and needed something to  eat and the local restaurants served them theses sandwiches and they took the name because they felt pity for them, so they called them  the ‘poor boy sandwich’ which became po’boy.”

 

Informant: Caitlin Flint, age 21, Metairie, LA, collected on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone.

Transcript:

“The fourth bit of slang is food slang- so a ‘po’boy.’ A po’boy is a type of sandwich, it is on, it is a, very similar to a sub, it is on French bread which is very crispy and crunch on the outside, very very soft and fluffy on the inside. White bread.. it usually has mayonnaise on it, and some sort of meat, whether that meat is some sort of deli meat, or cooked roast beef, or fried fish or even grilled fish. Honestly it depends on which particular shop you are buying to po’boy from. Po’boys are a traditional New Orleans Food, its basically a sandwich, but there are little twists that make it a little bit different. The original phrase po’boy is basically a shortening of the two words ‘poor’ ‘boy’ so in some restaurants you will see it advertised as a ‘poor boy’, but that is a lot more difficult to say, especially if you are speaking with a genuine New Orleans accent. Which I don’t actually possess. A po’ boy, originally it comes from when, immigrants to new Orleans, decided they wanted to start making and selling food that was easy to hold while they worked, like most sandwich stories, they took meat and vegetable and put it in between soft baguettes- French bread- and then they made a sandwich. And because it was being sold to the working class they were called ‘poor boys’ that obviously then devolved into po’boy, and so po’ boys are a quintessential New Orleans thing, My personal type of po’boy is grilled shrimp with mayonnaise lettuce, Tomato, and hot sauce.”

 

Informant: Erin Fell, age 21, New Orleans, collected on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone

Transcript: Next is “Po’boy.” It comes from the words “poor boy.” It was a sandwich with lots of toppings on it that was very cheap for people to buy. Um, it is similar to a Subway sandwich or a hoagie, but um, it is made with French bread. This is typical to the Louisiana tradition. A Po’boy, if it’s dressed, that means that it has the typical toppings on it like lettuce and tomato and all that good stuff. A debris Po’boy from Mother’s, it’s a restaurant on Poydras Street. That means that that means that it’s the little bits of pork and meats that come off of the main roast while you’re cooking. It’s those little juicy bits at the bottom of the pan. That’s a debris po’boy.

Informant info: (Left to Right) Sadhana Puri, age 20, Jessica Link, age 20, Alex Ledoux, age 21 all from New Orleans, LA

 

Transcript:

“Jessica: po’boy

Alex: Segway to po’boy.

Jessica: Dressed.

Sadhana: Po’boy and dressed, yeah.

Katelyn: Yeah, those two.

Alex: Yeah, dressed is really an important word to say.  So I actually find that

Sadhana: We should actually talk about po’boys, what are they?

Alex: Po’boys are sandwiches like but on French Bread

Sadhana: But where-

Jessica: But

Sadhana: But where did it originate, so it was originally poor boy

Jessica: my mom and my grandma still say poor boy.

Alex: Yeah my grandmother still says poor boy.

Sadhana: Some people do.

Sadhana: I thought it was just people who were from out of state  who come to New Orleans and say poor boy.

Jessica: No no it’s definitely like ah-

Alex: That’s like-

Jessica:  It’s called that because like that’s what the poor boys ate.  When there were poor boys in the olden days.

Sadhana:  It’s a really simple sandwich

Jessica: It’s like

Alex: It’s usually made with like the left overs

Sadhana:  That’s also the other thing.

Jessica:  Yeah it’s like French Bread and meat and stuff. I remember I got mad because there was a New York Times quiz last year that was trying to determine where you’re from,  because it was a quiz.  Um by what you say.  And it was like what do you call a long sandwich.

Sadhana: It was like a hoagie

Jessica: And it was like a sub a hoagie or a po’boy.  And of course I chose po’boy, but to me a sub and a po’boy are different. .

Alex: Yeah.

Jessica: Like a  po’boy is a very specific type of sub

Alex: Like a po’ boy is only on French bread.  Where as like a sub can be like on all those fancy things at subway.  Like wheat.

Jessica: exactly, yeah.

Sadhana: And they’re also dressed a certain way.

Alex: They’re dressed.  Oh yeah, i have a little story, so dressed.  So I had some friends form Dartmouth who were going to go down to New Orleans.  And they were like tell us all the non-touristy places to go.  So I told them to go to Parkway, which is actually where I met both of them for the first time.

Jessica: Oh my god that is…

Sadhana:   That is true, we ate po’boys for the first time we met.

Alex:  It’s one of those

Sadhana:  I had mine dressed

Alex: It’s one of those more famous po’boy places, yeah.  And I was like you need to ask to get it dressed.  And dressed means like you have everything.

Jessica: Yeah you just have all the toppings,

Alex: You have all the toppings, what are the toppings.  Mayonnaise lettuce tomato

Sadhana: Mayonnaise, tomato

Jessica: Mayonnaise, pickles, lettuce, tomatoes,

Alex:  Then whatever if you want like fried shrimp or like fried oysters.  What else do they have? I always get friend oysters.

Sadhana: Well that’s not considered dressed, that’s just what the po’boy is.

Alex: Yeah I know but like whatever meat.

Jessica:  roast beef is my favorite.

Sadhana: Yeah so there is fried oyster and roast beef.  Uh my favorite is fried oyster.  Only available on Mondays and Wednesdays at parkway,

Jessica: I didn’t know that.

Sadhana: The only days I go there.  That’s m favorite sandwich.

Jessica: But you can say like dressed without the pickles because I say that. And that’s interpreted, they understand that.

Sadhana: Like my dad says dressed without the mayonnaise.  He really doesn’t like mayonnaise.”

Collectors Commentary:

Keywords: New Orleans, po’boy, poboy, poor boy, sandwich, dressed, debris

Link

Lagniappe

Verbal Lore: folk Speech, slang — associated material, food lore

English/ French/ Spanish/ Quechua

United States of America/ France

Context:  A little something extra, or a small plate sent out by chefs at New orleans Fine dininf restaurants

Informant: Libby Flint, age 59, New Orleans resident of 36 years, originally from Upstate New York and Vermont. Collected May 22, 2016 and recorded on iphone

Transcript:

“ In New Orleans, If you give somebody something a little bit extra or  or something that comes free, its termed  ‘Lagniappe.’ Lagniappe means a Little something extra.”

 

Informant: Caitlin Flint, age 21, Metairie, LA, worked as a server in the French Quarter, New Orleans collected on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone.

Transcript:

“ The second word is the phrase ‘lagniappe.’ Lagniappe come from a French word. I’m actually not sure what it actually means in French, but growing up , my mother always described it to me  as meaning  ‘a little something extra,’ so  lagniappe was always used to describe if there was a small little gift that someone got and  tossed into the pile at Christmas or for birthday, or when they were visiting from far and they decided to bring a gift, the would call it ‘ just a little lagniappe for you. ’ it is also a phrase that is used almost exclusively in the  New Orleans restaurant  dining industry, as I said, I worked as a server, and in a lot of the New Orleans Restaurants, there is a practice of sending out what are called lagniappes to  values customers/ patrons, they were small little plates that were made by the chefs that were just a taste, just a small little, little something extra. For the patron who came in, in a lot of cases these were people who knew the owners, who were influential business folk. In general it just kind of helped reinforces this idea that, this little something extra was for those who were family, I guess it kind of fits in with how my family  always looked at it as a little nice something. That’s lagniappe.”

 

Informant: Brian Flint, age 23, Metairie, LA, collected on May 22, 2016 and recorded on an iphone.

Transcript:

“The first one I wanted to talk about was ‘Lagniappe’– That’s L-A-G-N-I-A-P-P-E . This word is pretty well used in the New Orleans area, it actually has origins in Quechua from Spanish Creoles that immigrated to the New Orleans , and still today in some Indian markets in Peru, Bolivia, and Colombia, you can hear people say, like ‘lagniappa’ which means ‘ give me something a little bit extra. ’ The term means  you know, ‘a little something extra on top to sweeten the deal’ you know ‘good will’  or something like that thirteenth donut in a baker’s dozen.”

Collectors Commentary:

Informant info: (Left to Right) Sadhana Puri, age 20, Jessica Link, age 20, Alex Ledoux, age 21 all from New Orleans, LA

Transcript:

“Jessica: lagniappe.

Alex: lagniappe

Sadhana: lagniappe

Alex: It just means like extra

Jessica: a little something extra

Sadhana: a little extra

Alex: like bonus or something

Sadhana: I remember one time I was taking a test and, um, my professor actually Jessica and I were in the same group my teacher Dr. Hightower.

Jessica: Dr. Hightower, yes, our English teacher.

Sadhana: Getting confused. Anyway, she was like- I was asking her if I could do this bonus question because I forgot to do it during the test.  She was like “I can’t give you a little lagniappe.” That’s what she called the bonus question during the test.

Jessica: That’s cute.

Sadhana: That was funny.

Jessica: She was very much like, like when someone uses it I feel it’s very much like, like it’s uh, like it’s I don’t know, it’s not a word I use super normally.  It’s not like brake tag, where it’s a fun- . When I say it, it’s like I know this is a special word.  But it’s not like totally weird.

Alex: It’s like you know what it is, but your don’t use it.

Sadhana: But you don’t use it like frequently.

Alex: you would say like bonus question.

Jessica: Like if I said a little Lagniappe.  I would only say that like once a week or a month.

Sadhana: And then at restaurants

Alex: I’ve actually never said that.

Jessica: If someone said that I would know what it means.  Also our newspaper, well our old newspaper, the times Louisiana, used to have a Lagniappe section

Sadhana: That’s true

Jessica: That was like a cool section

Sadhana: Also at restaurants when they have like condiments and extra things you can put on and stuff it’s called “lagniappe,” gonna add something to your po’boy which is another term.”

Key words: Lagniappe, New Orleans, a little something extra, restaurants, small plates